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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 647 (some duplicates have been removed)
-month deployment. captain mike napolitano is serving with the navy's expedition training group. while deployed in 2004, he spearheaded maritime patrol relief efforts toing the 2004 indian ocean tsunami, as well as numerous theater cooperation efforts throughout the pacific and in 2009 captain napolitano reported as commanding officer of the expeditionary training group. this is a fabulous panel and i know you're going to appreciate what they have to say. rear admiral, i think you'll start. >> first of all on behalf of the chilean navy i would like to thank so much to san francisco fleet week, particularly to admiral gary roughhead for being invited to participate in this senior seminar. it's a privilege for me to be here and to share with you the experience that we had just during and after the earthquake that we had in chile in february 27, 2010. most of the lessons learned that i'm going to show here to you is part of your concern and i'm very glad you are taking that in account so i think you are absolutely in the right path. anyway, it's a massive event that you always have to
you'll start. >> first of all on behalf of the chilean navy i would like to thank so much to san francisco fleet week, particularly to admiral gary roughhead for being invited to participate in this senior seminar. it's a privilege for me to be here and to share with you the experience that we had just during and after the earthquake that we had in chile in february 27, 2010. most of the lessons learned that i'm going to show here to you is part of your concern and i'm very glad you are taking that in account so i think you are absolutely in the right path. anyway, it's a massive event that you always have to work a lot in order to be prepared. i'm going to show you a short presentation where i'm going to thank that point starting from the general effect of the massive earthquake and then going down to the particular events that we've taken in care as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduc
moved 3 meters to the west and at the same time we lift up at about 3 meters in certain areas. so navy -- this is very important because in some places where you are supposed to get into with your ships, not any more. so a hydrographic survey, certain port was absolutely mandatory when you have this event. i said to the australian staff, because of that we are closer neighbors right now. here you can see an example that was before the earthquake, the distance of the low tide. and now it's absolutely far away. so some marine small sea life in there absolutely disappeared. that's another effect you can see a lighthouse in there before tsunami and where is the lighthouse in the middle of the island down there after the tsunami. so the bottom is absolutely came up. another example. another effect of -- global effect. because of the change of the mass of the earth, because it moves so it change slightly the configuration, it has an effect in the axis rotation of the globe. it moved 8 centimeters north pole to the east and that means rotation increased 1.26 millions of seconds so you wo
, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arrived in taiwan, the crisis was over and the maneuvers had been subsided. this positive result was possible because of the military capability of our navy and because both carrier battle groups were battle ready and able to steam towards their destination in less than 24 hours. so, why were we able to respond so effectively? certainly one important reason, because the technology in our ships was the best in the world. the results are true, that the training and the spirit of our sailors was superb. and we had absolutely first-class lea
, a variety of benevolent and goodwill outreach work. spent the british navy had a large impact on the war of 1812. while in alexandria, virginia, with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, we sat down with denver brunsman to discuss the navy shall. his book is "the evil necessity british naval impressment in the eighteenth-century atlantic world." it's next here on booktv. >> the british empire in the 18th century was really a maritime empire. as an island nation they depended really heavily on trade and controlling really the trade of the colonial territory. well, they need a very powerful navy, and the navy needed men. and so british naval ships really sell the world, but were specially consecrated indialantic. and this is how the system affected american colonists. when british naval vessels came into very sports, they often lost in because of the three d's, death, disease and desertion. the only way that they could resupply the ships was to capture colonists. so in that way, america was introduced to really what i can think of as the nasty underside of the british system that
. after the war, the navy decided that all of these cadets started at age 14, 818, graduated and went into the navy. but the navy had to rest this writing to the start of world war i. so they thought to make up for this, they would send them all to universities for six months just before they ground out the education. so within a few weeks of arriving there, he said one day he wandered over one of the world's leading physics laboratories to see what it would look like. very shortly after that, he told the navy that he was leaving and he wanted to become a scientist. he never did receive his phd. but he quickly became one of the world's great scientists. he would win the nobel prize in physics in 1948. he was good looking and had a commanding presence. an extraordinary combination of hands-on ability and theoretical machinations. he had a great ability to conceive of a problem and write out a few lines of mathematics and carried these experiments out and analyzed the results turkey was also one of a number of scientists in britain and in america that have been working hard behind the s
here in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains operational control but we send our operatives out to be controlled by the civic sight. we're comfortable with that and that's matured a lot in the last couple years. >> talked a lot about command and control and agreements and moving resources. one other question that came up yesterday we were discussing yesterday is how do communications occur specifically with regard to when we start talking about air ops and moving air resources around, how do we ensure that we have that interoperatability that we disc
displays. the roar of the navy's legendary flighter jets is about to go silent. cbs news reporter, mark strasman tells us the navy is already canceling a dons air shows. >> the mandatory federal budget cuts that will ground them beginning next monday. >> major loss, especially to this area and especially to the navy. this is a recruiting tool. >> these are the united states navy blue angels. >> since 1946, the blue angels and their acrobatic high speed stunts have wowed crowds and helped the navy with recruiting. but it's expensive pr and the navy must slash $4 billion. its share of the mandatory budget cuts. part of that is canceling the blue angel's regular season. an estimated savings of $20 million. >> right now we are waiting further guidance it find out what will happen for the blue angels practices as we continue into april and may. >> but the navy is not alone. the air force puts on a similar air show with the thunder birds, elite pilots demonstrating an f16. the same budget cuts forced the air force to cancel the remaining twenty shows in this year's thunder bird season.
information visit the authors website, exploding the phone. >> the british navy had a large impact on the war of 1812. while in alexandria viejo with the help of our local cable partner comcast we sat down with denver branson to discuss the navy's role. his book is that even a necessity. the 18th-century atlanta quarreled. its next here on book tv. >> the british empire in the 18th century was really a maritime empire. as an island nation depended heavily on trade and controlling the trade of various colonial territories. for this to work, you have a powerful navy. the navy needed man. and so british naval ships release sale the world. especially concentrated in the atlantic. and this is how the system affected american colonists. british naval vessels came into various ports. there are often losing men. death, disease, and desertion. the only way that they could resupply their ships was to capture columnists. so in that way america was introduced to really what i can't think of as the nasty underside of this british system that in many ways they benefited from an appreciated but does some hi
to debt and saw action at the battle of jutland, and after the war the navy decided that all of these cadets commend cadets in age britain at that time certain age 14 and age 18 they graduated and then -- went into the navy's midshipmen, but the navy had to rush this last class right into war with the start of world war one. they thought, to make up for the loss and in charge of their education it would send them all to universities for six months to sort of round out their education. blackett was sent to cambridge, and within a few weeks of arriving there he said one there wonder door to the famous cavendish laboratory to see what a scientific laboratory was like very shortly after that he told the navy, leaving the navy. i want to become scientists. the work he did 1930's discovering the positron, the positive electron. be hands-on ability and the theoretical imaginations. he had never known anyone his equal in order to conceive a problem in physics camarena felines in mathematics, build an apparatus to himself, ikaria the experiment, and analyze the results. he is also one
. [applause] >> the british navy had a large impact on the war of 1812. all in alexandria, virginia at the hope of our local cable partner comcast, we sat down with them for brunsman to discuss his book, "the evil necessity- british naval impressment in the eighteenth century atlantic world." it's next here on booktv. >> the british empire in the 18th century was really a maritime empire. as an island nation they depended heavily on trade in controlling the trade of various colonial territories. for this to work you needed a powerful navy in the navy needed men. the british naval ships really sailed the world, but were especially concentrated in the atlantic. this is how the system effect that american colonists. the british naval vessels came into various pores, they often lost men because of death, disease and assertion. the only way they could resupply ships was to capture columnists. so in that way, america was introduced to it i kind of think of is the nasty underside of this british system that in many ways they benefited from and appreciated, but they got some hands i was rea
. hello, everybody, and welcome to millionaire. kicking things off today is a u.s. navy captain who oversees the job assignments of 130,000 sailors and civilians. from norfolk, virginia, please welcome cynthia womble. nice to see you, cynthia. wow, that is a very, very big job. >> yes, it is. it's an amazing job and an amazing opportunity to take care of the sailors and their families all across the u.s. atlantic fleet and all across the navy, take care of those folks who are out there fighting for our freedom. >> absolutely. we appreciate all your efforts as well. you--cynthia, you joined the navy back in 1989, i believe. >> 1989. >> very few women were joining the navy at that point. >> that is true. >> what made you decide to do it, and what was it like for a woman back then? >> well, it was challenging, and i think you have similar experiences in television, actually, with how challenging it can be with trying to balance a family and a career. it definitely was not the normal thing to do. i was one of very few in my high school who even considered it at the time who was female.
confiscating cargo without american voters. the navy was the most powerful in the world, couldn't this be paid with impunity on the high seas. madison's third reason for war was evidence the british employed secret agents. we didn't like it then. we don't like it now. fourth, it was alleged that the british were stirring up the indians. the term native americans to coming to use until the 1960s and in his declaration of war madison refused but referred to the warfare by the savages in the northwest territory. he blamed the english for causing trouble and for some degree it was true. with the support of a new faction in congress called war hawk, the rationale for war, probably didn't urge that the people around madison told him taking canada would be an easy matter. his mentor, jefferson, predicted the capture of canada would be a mere matter of marching which makes good alliteration but unfortunately bad soothsaying. didn't play out that way at all. next i am delighted to say i must talk about this event. i knew when i decided to write this book that i wanted to tell the from a human perspecti
he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to be able to speak in front of such a distinguished audience. secretary schultz, mrs. schultz, pleasure it see you and you lend tremendous gaffe tas to this program. general spees, distinguished flag officers, general officers and mostly everybody here who is in the readiness business, i am honored to be speaking to a group of people and that would include i think everybody in this hanger deck who is part of that cadre of individuals who when bad things happen and everybody runs out, your job is to run in. it
shipman aboard a battleship in world war ii. after the war the navy decided that all of these cadets in britain at that time started at age 14, and at age 18 they yachted and went into the -- graduated and went intobe the navy as midshipmen, but the navy had had to rush this last class right into war with the start of world war i, so they thought to make up for the loss and interruption of their education, thegd send them all to university for six months just to round out their education. blackett was sent to cambridge, and he said one day i wandered over to the cavendish laboratory to see what a scientific lahr story was like, and very shortly after that he told the navy i want to become a scientist. he never did receive a ph.d., but he quickly became one of the world's foremost physicists for the work he did in the 1930s discovering the positive terror, the positive electron, the first piece of antimatter whose existence was confirmed. he would win the nobel prize in physics in 1948. he was good looking, had an extraordinary combination of hands-on ability and theoretical imaginati
popping when you study the issue. now, we need to do something about our costs of fuel. the navy plans to spend close to $200 million on advanced biofuels -- excuse me, the navy already spent $200 million on advanced biofuels between fiscal year 2009 and 2012. the $60 million we're talking is a small fraction of the navy's annual costs for petroleum and approximately $4.5 billion in fiscal year 2011. secretary of the navy maebus has talked about how energy security is a growing national security issue not only for our country but also for specifically for the d.o.d. and so what is the answer to that? we have to be able to look at advanced -- funding for the advanced drop in the biofuel program. and as senator durbin said, the senate has already voted twice in support of the department of d.o.d.'s biofuel programs. the department continues to spend money in fiscal 2012 for biofuels. the fiscal 2013 will maintain funding to pursue the program in future years. i think -- i would hope that we would understand what are the real costs facing the department of defense? and just because you do
army and some from the navy, air force, maybe even coast guard. >> ama: the sons of san jose monument was built entirely by volunteers and is located east of hb pavilion. >> ahead, u.s. navy warship gets stuck, and it took ingenuity to remove it. >>> pope francis adds to the catholic ranks during holy saturday mass at the vatican. >>> and live doppler 7hd showses a storm system heading our way. league will >> the u.s. navy provided this video of u.s. crews lifting section0s the ship from the reef in the philippines. the ship had to be cut into sections and airlifted from the water on to a barge. the final section of the hull, weighing 250 tons, was safely removed. the 224-foot ship ran aground more than two months ago, damaging the reef that is an underwater sanctuary. crews are few assessing the reef damage. officials say charts used by the navy misplaced its location by nine miles. >>> pope francis presided over his first easter vigil as the head of the roman catholic church today. >> the holy saturday papal mass started with the blessing of the fire and easter proclamation, francis
to showcase what our united states navy and our marine corps, our sea-going services, bring to the table in an emergency response, but recognize that they also have another mission to do, macon island just came off a 7-month deployment, this is an era when we're pivoting to the pacific. the ring of fire is also in the pacific. over 35,000 on average fatalities a year over 35 billion dollars worth of damage and we see that year in and year out with tsunamis of catastrophic proportions. today the coast guard is dealing with the debris from that tsunami as it comes ashore here in the state waters as well. just it close on admire beeman's remarks, i think it's critical not just the work here at seminar but over a cup of coffee exchanging business cards because at the end of the day it's the partnerships that mufrt endure at time of crisis. thank you to the macon island for this show of force during this third fleet week. >> i'd like to bring up the mayor of the great city and county of san francisco. what a difference he's made as the mayor of san francisco. he certainly has welcomed flee
a was mentioned this morning. that was a fantastic piece of work by the navy. it turned around the attitudes of niche a toward the united states. it was a the kind of building block we look for in an economic and security commons. just as when we in san francisco see not only what the military can bring to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier for them to collaborate with us. so, all of these things are important to us as we have these exercises. so, i say this is a very worthwhile enterprise that will keep going. i tip my hat to my friend mike who really has been leading us in these efforts. and now i say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we'
say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we're going to have the former secretary defense william perry speak. and the final speaker tomorrow will be the commander of north com, it will be the first time the northern command... >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to day two of the senior leader seminar for san francisco fleet week 2012. we had a great day yesterday and we're going to have an even greater day today. we've got a number of people that i would like to bring up to welcome you all. while this senior leader seminar is going on, there's a number of other activities that are going on at the same time. and a very important activity is some training that's taking place on treasure island. it's training by the san francisco fire department and it's become a huge hit with the marines and the sailors
eye. ford's experience of combat shaped "they were expendable," an elegy navy picture about sacrifice and defeat made at the end of the war. during the war, ford held the rank, lieutenant commander in charge of the field photographic branch at the office of strategic services. he was glad to get away from hollywood. he'd always wanted to be a naval man from way, way back. he failed to get into annapolis when he was a young man and went to hollywood. (narrator) ford's end-of-war hommage to those that served starred robert montgomery and john wayne. slug, he was always quotin' verse... (narrator) wayne had built a reputation as a b-movie tough. bits of poetry... (narrator) but ford changed all that. so here's one for him. it's about the only one i know. under the wide, starry sky, dig the grave and let me lie, glad that i lived and gladly die. many of these hollywood films were made according to device. "okay, we gotta make a war picture." again, "we gotta make a picture that'll make people want to join the army." (lindsay anderson) "they were expendable" is an extraordinary personal fi
at the arrangement. and as you mentioned there's a potential impact as you may have heard the navy is talking about eliminating funding for fleet program for the blue angels like flight team for both the navy and air force. and it's estimated to have about 64 million dollars impact on our country and it's important to be tracking and advocating about. in closings the ultimate impacts are unclear you can see we have to red dots which means we've gotten no formal notification from the 0 itself that those are happening on a timeline. there's still a considerable amount of uncertainty. so the impacts are still significant so for example, potentially this year up to 8 and a half million dollars of general impacts and next year an estimated $13 million in estimated general impacts. so when he think about the other fell rescues regarding hiv and aids funding. there's a trade-off that you and the mayor will have to look at. the reason there's some upper certain here the city received a significant amount of direct federal money but we receive an additional amount of grants. so you can imagine we're at the
. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor frequency. but from a command control perspective, we're fairly robust. are we perfect, no, but we do have layered defenses against that. >> miss yeager, i don't know if you want to say anything from a national guard perspective. >> we have some mobile explorable platforms we can send out to incidents to help provide additional infrastructure in the event everything breaks down then our units have organic communications capability so i can move that out and i can help reinforce cal fire on their incident with what i have in the aviation brigade and units through the state of california have that same communication but the iceu, which is a mobile communications platform, is ideal in events like this to push out to help. >> any other questions? >> i have one. back in 1992 when it was a big fir
plan. >> if you talk to my marine brethren, they may kit indicate that the navy would leave you. [laughter] >> some of you got that. it has to do with a little i sland that -- * [laughter] >> anyway, i can assure you that the u.s. navy is not going to leave. and some of the things that i used to back that up, general ka joe bastardi i, commander in the northern command, who really has overall responsibility for a military effort with regards to domestic support to civil authorities will be here tomorrow. i think it's the first time that we've had the commander in the northern command and the three such sos that we've had, he is going to adopt a model that we employed with the immediate response assistance that i indicated to you earlier that we used earlier this year. he's going to adopt that as the model for northern command with the army and the air force to use. i think the momentum that we have gained here over the last three years, we leveraged off of that. we started a similar senior leadership seminar up in seattle, that we had the first one this year. they have some peop
.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all of government, from local all the way up to the white house, fully included in
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 647 (some duplicates have been removed)

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